Depression Treatment Bangalore

Are you Depressed?

If you identify the following signs and symptoms, be CAUTIOUS, you may be suffering from clinical Depression and may require immediate depression.

  • you can’t sleep or you sleep too much
  • you can’t concentrate or find that previously pleasurable tasks are now difficult
  • you feel hopeless and helpless
  • you can’t control your negative thoughts, no matter how much you try
  • you have lost your appetite or you can’t stop eating
  • you are much more irritable, short-tempered, or aggressive than usual
  • you’re consuming more alcohol than normal or engaging in other reckless behavior
  • you have thoughts that life is not worth living

Therefore, if you are concerned, communicate with our doctors & get the depression treatment in Bangalore!!

If a formal evaluation is needed for diagnosis, it will be done by a comprehensive medical, developmental, educational and psychosocial depression therapy in Bangalore to help you to deal with it so that you can function productively in the social milieu and live to the fullest.

What is Depression?

Sadness or downswings in mood are normal reactions to life’s struggles, set-backs, and disappointments. Many people use the word “Depression” to ex-plain these kinds of feelings, but depression is much more than just sadness. However, some depressed people don't feel sad at all—they may feel lifeless, empty, and apathetic, angry, aggressive, and restless. Whatever the symp-toms, depression is different from normal sadness in that it engulfs your day-to-day life, interfering with your ability to work, study, eat, sleep, and have fun. The feelings of helplessness, hopelessness, and worthlessness are intense with little relief.

Many people with clinical depression wonder if their symptoms will go away on their own with time. Many say that "time heals all wounds," but that's not entirely true when it comes to depression. Depression is a serious mental illness that cannot be willed away or waited out.
If you have been diagnosed with depression, you need to get proper treatment in order to get better. You should not suffer needlessly when depression is a highly treatable illness. In fact, between 80% and 90% of people who get treatment feel better.1 Treatment usually includes medication, therapy, or a combination of the two.

Treatment for depression

There's no one proven way that people recover from depression, and it's different for everyone. However, there are a range of effective treatments and health professionals who can help you on the road to recovery.
There are also plenty of things you can do for yourself to recover and stay well. The important thing is finding the right treatment and the right health professional for your needs.

Psychological Treatment

Psychological treatments can help you change your thinking patterns and improve your coping skills so you're better equipped to deal with life's stresses and conflicts. As well as supporting your recovery, psychological therapies can also help you stay well by identifying and changing unhelpful thoughts and behaviour.


1.Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT)

CBT is a structured psychological treatment which recognises that the way we think (cognition) and act (behaviour) affects the way we feel. CBT is one of the most effective treatments for depression, and has been found to be useful for a wide range of ages, including children, adolescents, adults and older people.
CBT involves working with a professional (therapist) to identify thought and behaviour patterns that are either making you more likely to become depressed, or stopping you from getting better when you’re experiencing depression.
It works to change your thoughts and behaviour by teaching you to think rationally about common difficulties, helping you to shift negative or unhelpful thought patterns and reactions to a more realistic, positive and problem-solving approach.

2.Interpersonal therapy (IPT)

IPT is a structured psychological therapy that focuses on problems in personal relationships and the skills needed to deal with these. IPT is based on the idea that relationship problems can have a significant effect on someone experiencing depression, and can even contribute to the cause.
IPT helps you recognise patterns in your relationships that make you more vulnerable to depression. Identifying these patterns means you can focus on improving relationships, coping with grief and finding new ways to get along with others.

3.Behaviour therapy

While behaviour therapy is a major component of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT), unlike CBT it doesn’t attempt to change beliefs and attitudes. Instead it focuses on encouraging activities that are rewarding, pleasant or satisfying, aiming to reverse the patterns of avoidance, withdrawal and inactivity that make depression worse.

4.Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy

MBCT is generally delivered in groups and involves a type of meditation called 'mindfulness meditation'. This teaches you to focus on the present moment – just noticing whatever you’re experiencing, whether it's pleasant or unpleasant – without trying to change it. At first, this approach is used to focus on physical sensations (like breathing), but then moves on to feelings and thoughts.

Medical Treatment

The main medical treatment for depression is antidepressant medication. There's a lot of misinformation about antidepressant medication and while there is no simple explanation as to how it works, it can be very useful in the treatment of moderate to severe depression and some anxiety disorders.


If you're experiencing moderate to severe depression your doctor may prescribe antidepressant medication, along with psychological treatments. Antidepressants are sometimes prescribed when other treatments have not been successful or when psychological treatments aren't possible due to the severity of the condition or a lack of access to the treatment.

People with more severe forms of depression (bipolar disorder and psychosis) generally need to be treated with medication. This may include one or a combination of mood stabilisers, anti-psychotic drugs and antidepressants.

Other Source of Support

If left untreated, depression and anxiety can go on for months, even years. The good news is that a range of effective treatments are available, as well as things you can do yourself to recover and stay well.

Different treatments work for different people, and it’s best to speak to your GP or mental health professional about your options and preferences. If you’ve taken the first step and talked through some treatment options with a health professional, you might like to try a few of the following ideas for lifestyle changes and social support. Most people find that a combination of things work best.

It's important to remember that recovery can take time, and just as no two people are the same, neither are their recoveries. Be patient and go easy on yourself.